Exhibit With Us

Are you an Artist? Would you like to have an exhibition?

Artists, curators, artist collectives, community groups and organisations are all welcome to apply to exhibit in the Heart Galleries. Applications open in August every year for exhibitions in the following calendar year.

Please contact us if you would like to receive an email to let you know when applications open.

Applications are accessed by the Gallery Management Committee to ensure the exhibitions meet the needs of the Hospital Community. The Gallery Management Committee meets monthly to provide advice and input on the gallery program.

Meet the Gallery Management Committee

Alison Russell

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Alison

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Alison

Director Centre for Education and Training, WCHN

Why is art important in the Hospital? Art provides a distraction for children, women and their families who need to come to the hospital for treatment and puts a smile on the faces of staff who work here.  The changing landscape in the galleries and other spaces makes it feel like a dynamic, fun environment.

What was your favourite art activity when you were a kid? I was lucky enough to be exposed to just about every art and craft activity and was a graduate of the Ruth Tuck art classes in primary school.  My favourite creation there was a wire sculpture dripped with plaster of Paris!  When I was a bit older I loved photography and had a darkroom set up in mum’s laundry.

Who is your favourite artist? Or art movement? Gail Kellet is my favourite at the moment-I have just commissioned her to do a work for me it inspired me every day!  I also love the work of Margaret Preston.

Lis Brittan

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Lisa

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Lisa

Manager WCHN Volunteers

Why is art important in the Hospital? It has long been believed that there is an underlying healing power of art and now a growing body of research to underpin this belief. This includes both the making art and also experiencing art. For me, experiencing art in its many forms is a normal part of life. Anything that normalises and enhances the hospital experience is important.

What was your favourite art activity when you were a kid? I loved making things and enjoyed my experiences with batik, macramé, pottery and textiles. I am in awe of portrait and landscape artists because what I saw in my head never translated on to paper or canvas!

Who is your favourite artist? Or art movement? Gustav Klimt. The style, detail and use of colour fascinate me. As a romantic I love ‘The Kiss’, probably his most famous work.

Jackie Barreau

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Jacqui

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Jacqui

WCHN Consumer Representative

Why is art important in the Hospital? It can provide a stress release, for those who may be experiencing a difficult time as a patient or care-giver. It provides a healing environment, and improves health and well-being.

Art nurtures not just the patient, but the patient’s family and the doctors and nurses that walk the hospital corridors.

 The British Medical Journal quotes R. Cork, who said that “art is able to provide solace, exhilaration, and satisfaction in a huge variety of different forms. Above all it is able to humanise a building, infusing an often soulless and impersonal environment with affirmation…many critical moments in our lives occur there—from birth through to death—and they ought to take place in surroundings which honour their true significance.”

What was your favourite art activity when you were a kid? Well I was hooked on comics as a primary school student and would spend hours sketching cartoon characters. Vintage comics like Archie and Jughead, Little Lotta, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Tom and Jerry and Charlie Brown were just a few that gave me hours of entertainment. I filled many sketchbooks over the years.

Who is your favourite artist? Or art movement? I enjoyed Van Gogh’s work in my teens as I studied Art in high school. More recently I am appreciating all genres including street art that is prolific here in Adelaide. I enjoy following artists on Instagram including Sue Norman who apart from producing manadalas in the sand on Brighton beach works with acrylics also. I also like Elizabeth Close – APY lands that combine her unique, contemporary aboriginal art in mixed media.

Emily Collins

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Jacqui

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee
member Jacqui

WCHN History and Heritage Consultant

Why is art important in the Hospital? Art is important everywhere and anytime. Art is important in this hospital and every hospital as it can offer solace, respite and distraction for patients dealing with illness, pain, injury and feelings of being overwhelmed in an otherwise sterile, clinical environment. Participation in art making in a hospital enables creativity and affective self-expression, and can facilitate the development of mechanisms of coping and communication. Art has the capacity in this hospital to engage its makers, experiencers and bystanders – child patients, their families and the hospital staff alike – intellectually and emotionally, and connect them with each other. It is a source of colour and beauty, and every hospital can do with more colour and beauty … especially ones with small patients.

What was your favourite art activity when you were a kid? My art leanings are more of the performing kind, and so I got a kick out of ‘appearing’ to my best friend (waiting in the lounge room) in 70s clothes mined from my mother’s wardrobe, singing along to songs curated from my parents’ old records. ‘Big Spender’ (Shirley Bassey) and ‘Grandma’s Feather Bed’ (John Denver) were two memorable favourites. My styling for the latter song involved a pair of brown flares and a piece of stalk to chew on, acquired from a dried flower arrangement from one of my mother’s rustic brown pottery vessels!

Who is your favourite artist? Or art movement? My favourite art movement is abstract expressionism, and I am a big fan of Japanese wabi sabi ceramics! I also enjoy the glorious colour theories of Emily Kame Kngwarreye and many of the Bribie Island works of Ian Fairweather.

Jill Newman

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Jill

Image of Arts In Health exhibitions gallery committee member Jill

WCHF Manager Arts in Health

Why is art important in the Hospital? “The Arts and Humanities aren’t just there to be consumed when we have a free moment. We need them like medicine. They help us live.” Barack Obama

The arts can help to distract, entertain, calm, stimulate, bring joy – it can help make the environment more child-friendly and help the time spent at hospital feel better.

Studies have demonstrated that incorporating arts programs and activities into health settings can have positive impacts for patients and families – reduce stress and anxiety, shorten lengths of stays in Hospital and help alleviate pain.

What was your favourite art activity when you were a kid? I always loved making things indoor and out from craft items to paintings. When I was little I won a State painting competition and had my work shown in a ‘real’ gallery space. I also achieved my Lego Masters Builder Certificate and got to go to a special Lego exhibition held only for ‘Master Builders’.

Who is your favourite artist? Or art movement? Rene Magritte – A Surrealist Painter – famous for painting a picture of a pipe and calling the painting  – Ceci n’est pas une pipe (This is Not a Pipe) because it wasn’t a pipe –  it was a painting of a pipe. I was very lucky to see the real painting one day and just loved the idea of art playing little tricks and being intriguing.

Your gift of $5 could assist in delivering our Play Therapist sessions to enrich children’s days whilst in hospital.

Your gift of $10 could provide necessary equipment for babies in neonatal intensive care.

Your gift of $20 could help to further fund CAR-T research to assist in finding cures for childhood cancer.

Your gift of $25 could assist in delivering our Play Therapist sessions to enrich children’s days whilst in hospital.

Your gift of $50 could provide necessary equipment for babies in neonatal intensive care.

Your gift of $75 could help to further fund CAR-T research to assist in finding cures for childhood cancer.

Your gift of $39 could assist in delivering our Play Therapist sessions to enrich children's days while in hospital ($468 Annual Amount).

Your gift of $49 could help purchase at-home equipment for children recovering at home, meaning more time with their family ($588 Annual Amount).

Your gift of $69 could provide necessary equipment for babies in neonatal intensive care ($828 Annual Amount).

Your gift of $99 could help to further fund CAR-T research to assist in finding cures for childhood cancer ($1,188 Annual Amount).

Your gift of $1,000 will help support the build of the Women’s & Children’s Hospital Foundation’s Beach House project.

Your gift of $2,500 will help support the build of the Women’s & Children’s Hospital Foundation’s Beach House project.

Your gift of $5,000 will help support the build of the Women’s & Children’s Hospital Foundation’s Beach House project.

You’re donating $0 (minimum of $5). Your gift will help support the build of the Women’s & Children’s Hospital Foundation’s Beach House project.

Your generous support will help make the Beach House project at Encounter Lakes, Victor Harbor, a reality.

Your generous support will help us search for a cure for Paediatric Cancer.

Your support of $20 will provide families like Hannah’s with access to exceptional care, treatment and services.

Your contribution of $30 will help your Hospital to continue to deliver first class care and services to children like Hannah and their families.

Your donation of $50 will help to fund vital hospital equipment, services and research that helps children like Hannah to have the best chance at recovery.

Your support of $25 will provide families like Hannah’s with access to exceptional care, treatment and services.

Your contribution of $50 will help your Hospital to continue to deliver first class care and services to children like Hannah and their families.

Your donation of $75 will help to fund vital hospital equipment, services and research that helps children like Hannah to have the best chance at recovery.

You’re donating $0 (minimum of $5). Your support will make the difference to physical and occupational therapy programs that get children like Hannah home sooner.

You’re donating $0 (minimum of $5). Every dollar makes a difference to helping your hospital and supporting children and their families when they need it most.

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