New equipment for intensive care patients

The WCH Foundation has purchased a new piece of equipment for patients in the Women’s and Children’s Hospital (WCH) Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) to help them participate in physical activity earlier.

The WCH admits approximately 500 patients to PICU each year.

Long-stay PICU patients are at risk of ICU-acquired weakness and survivors of critical illness are reported to have long-term physical, psychological and quality-of-life impairments. These collective impairments are referred to as Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS).

A MOTOmed Layson supine cycle is a piece of equipment to help patients at risk of PICS. Mobilisation techniques can be limited for critically ill children, so this cycle provides a safe and feasible way for patients to participate in physical activity earlier. It works similarly to an exercise bike, however patients use it lying down in bed and can participate even if they are very weak. The aim of the equipment is to reduce the prevalence of ICU-acquired weakness and, therefore, improve the mental health and wellbeing of patients at risk of PICS.

PICU Senior Physiotherapist, Millie Dynon, says, “This device is used to encourage early mobilisation and to reduce the negative impacts of a prolonged PICU admission, including delirium and ICU-acquired weakness.”

“Early mobilisation can contribute to a shorter stay in PICU and minimise the deconditioning of long stay patients. Therefore, the MOTOmed Layson can positively impact the mental health and wellbeing of critically unwell patients.”

PICU patient using the new supine cycle in the rehabilitation gym with Senior Physiotherapist, Millie Dynon.

Previous PICU patient using the new supine cycle in the rehabilitation gym with Senior Physiotherapist, Millie Dynon.

Supine cycle

The WCH completed a six-week trial of a MOTOmed Layson supine cycle with a loan device from the Royal Adelaide Hospital. It was used for three patients, and each one tolerated it well.

Millie said, “The device was particularly useful for a patient who was very limited in his mobility options due to his condition. He used the device on average twice a week and was able to compete against his previous rides to improve his performance.”

“We had very positive feedback from patients, staff and families during our trial. The parents of the patients who used it were also very satisfied with the device and happy to see their children participating in physical activity while limited by their illness.”

Following this positive trial, we have now purchased the WCH a MOTOmed Layson supine cycle of their own to use in PICU!

PICU patient and Millie Dynon with the supine cycle purchased thanks to SA Power Networks Employee Foundation.

Previous PICU patient and Millie Dynon with the supine cycle purchased thanks to SA Power Networks Employee Foundation.

SA Power Networks Employee Foundation

Thank you to our friends at SA Power Networks Employee Foundation who funded the purchase of this equipment!

Our CEO, Jane Scotcher, says, “We are so grateful for the long-term, continued support we receive from SA Power Networks employees. Their generous contributions help us improve the health and wellbeing of women, children and families who are cared for by the Women’s and Children’s Hospital and its associated Health Network.”

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