Grant Funding

The WCH Foundation regularly engages with the staff of the Women’s and Children’s Health Network to fund their innovative ideas through grant rounds.

Upwards of $150,000 worth of grants are awarded each March and September to projects that align with the mission of the WCH Foundation.

These grants encourage WCHN staff to consider improvements to their areas, allowing them to continue providing the most brilliant care to families.

Grant applications are accepted for the following purposes: 

  • To improve the health and wellbeing of children in their first 1,000 days
  • To improve the mental health and wellbeing of women and children under the care of the Women’s and Children’s Health Network
  • To improve the support during periods of transition. For example:
    – Children from the paediatric to adult care facility
    – Parents when their child is progressing from acute care to the ward
    – New mothers from hospital to the community
    – Bereaved parents from hospital to the community
  • To improve the health care journey for culturally diverse groups
  • Projects/programs aimed at supporting siblings and families

March 2021 grant recipients

Grant Tier – $50,000

  • Tamas Revesz (Paediatrics) – to develop and improve culturally appropriate educational resources to support Aboriginal children diagnosed with cancer and their families

 

Grant Tier – $20,000

  • Angela Cavallaro (NICU/SCBU) – for staff education, consumer rep and equipment to improve supportive care and parental connection for families

 

Grant Tier – $10,000

  • Carmel Mercer (WABS – Aboriginal Family Birthing Program) – to purchase breastpumps for mums where the baby is not in NICU/SCBU
  • Beverly Gloede (Nursing and Midwifery) – to develop an online learning module in relation to Austism Spectrum Disorder to help staff and clients of WCHN
  • Carmel Mercer (WABS – Aboriginal Family Birthing Program) – for baby smokerlyser motivational tool for pregnant women trying to reduce smoking
  • Callie Ayles (Paedriatic Medicine – MRCHO) –  for oncology school visit program
  • Nicki Ferencz (Allied Health Complex Sub Acute and Spiritual Care) – for education and support group for children and young people to manage chronic pain during 12 month wait to see chronic pain service
  • Kim Voss (Youth & Women’s Safety & Wellbing division) – to develop the garden at Port Adelaide site to a healing garden to support women subjected to domestic and family violence
  • Jane Rosser (Child Protection Services – Out of Home Care Clinic) – for scoping study of the feasibility of a GP shared care program for young people living in residential care facilities
  • Ella Gleeson (Paediatric Medicine) –  for new Telstra bedside monitors for the medical short stay ward
  • Franca Foti (Child Protection Services) – to purchase resources such as sensory toys and aids for children under guardian care to create a more welcoming and calming spaces within the Samuel Way building
  • Tara O’Kelly (WABS – AFBP) – for a support group for women in the Aboriginal Family Birthing Program and their families
  • Rosalin Powrie (CAMHS) – for the continuation of Mind in Labour Mind in Life antental childbirth education program

The impact of our grants

The WCH Foundation supported the creation of a ‘Butterfly Garden’ at the Women’s Health Services site in Port Adelaide as a healing space for clients who have suffered trauma and violence and for the staff that support them.

Social Worker, Women’s Health Services

Being in nature has been shown to reduce symptoms of stress which in turn rests and calms the nervous system which is often severely impacted by trauma for victims of domestic and family violence.

“Women with lived experience have often used the symbol of the butterfly to represent the healing recovery journey… so it’s pretty special to be able to build this (Butterfly) Garden.”

– Social Worker, Women’s Health Services

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